Karelian Bear Dog: Breed Characteristics & Care

History, Care Tips, and Helpful Information for Pet Owners

Karelian-Bear-Dog

The Karelian bear dog is a medium-sized spitz that’s popular in Finland and best known for its courageous ability to hunt large and sometimes dangerous game. It’s also known for its thick, dense coat, small eyes, and signature spitz tail that curls up over its back. The Karelian is identified to keep bears away from human-inhabited areas of state parks, but it’s not a breed that shows up often as a pet in American households.

Breed Overview

GROUP: Working

HEIGHT: 19 to 23.5 inches

WEIGHT: 44 to 49 pounds

COAT: Dense and short

COAT COLOR: Black with white markings  

LIFE SPAN: 11 to 13 years

TEMPERAMENT: Cautious, independent, loyal, territorial, brave, tenacious

HYPOALLERGENIC: No

ORIGIN: Northwestern Europe

Characteristics of the Karelian Bear Dog

The most notable characteristic of a Karelian bear dog is its fearlessness. Though not a large canine, this dog is bred to corner huge and frightening animals but not to kill them, which can make thcan be breed an excellent guard dog or watchdog. The Karelian is highly spirited and energetic, which often can overwhelm new dog owners. The breed is also very loyal and protective of its human family, but care should be taken when the dog is in the presence of young children.

Affection LevelMedium
FriendlinessMedium
Kid-FriendlyLow
Pet-FriendlyMedium
Exercise NeedsHigh
PlayfulnessHigh
Energy LevelHigh
TrainabilityHigh
IntelligenceHigh
Tendency to BarkMedium
Amount of SheddingMedium

History of the Karelian Bear Dog

The Karelian bear dog is an ancient canine breed that shares its ancestry with the now-extinct Komi dog. Being an ancient dog breed, it has been difficult for experts to determine the specifics of the breed’s origin. However, evidence suggests that the Karelian bear dog may have originated in Northwestern Europe and was used by Finnish and Russian farmers and hunters because of the breed’s hunting skills.

This breed is uncommon in the U.S. but is one of the top 10 most common breed of dogs in Finland. In the U.S., Karelian Bear dogs are used by wildlife agencies, as well as state park and ranger services in Alaska, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, and Washington, for bear control. The Wind River Bear Institute, which aims to reduce human-caused bear mortality and conflicts worldwide, also utilizes Karelian bear dogs to teach the bears to stay away from areas populated by humans.

The Karelian bear dog is rare enough that it was placed into the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, which is a breed registry specifically for the documentation of rare breeds within the U.S. Owners of rare breeds work to get the dogs recognized in the U.S. The breed was allowed to start competing in AKC companion events in 2008. But there are still only a few hundred Karelians in the U.S. by logging the birth and parentage of each dog.

Karelian Bear Dog Care

Though a Karelian bear dog can be affectionate and loyal to its owner, the dog is still considered wilder rather than domesticated. If you are bringing a Karelian into your home, it’s important to begin socialization at a young age because of the hunting aspect of the dog’s personality. Fortunately, even without a bear to hunt or a farm to guard, there are plenty of opportunities to keep a working dog like the Karelian busy.

Exercise

Karelians are energetic, athletic, and have a tenacious work ethic, so providing them with daily exercise and job to do is extremely important; it does not necessarily have to be in the form of productive work but can include focused play.

The dog will need a vigorous daily walk of one hour and keep your Karelian on a leash during the walk. However, the dog will need much more daily exercise than one walk. Offer a Karelian activities such as dog puzzle toys, scent work, long exploratory hikes, rally obedience, and agility training.

Grooming

The Karelian requires basic grooming but with a bit more attention on its all-weather coat that is short but dense. The coat only requires minimal grooming, brushing it once to twice weekly to remove loose fur and prevent matting combined with the occasional bath will keep your dog looking its best. As with other dog breeds, nails should be trimmed every three to four weeks as needed.

Training

This breed is intelligent, and when trained with consistency and patience, the dog learns quickly. Karelians respond well to positive reinforcement with toy and food rewards, a stable routine, and lots of love.

Common Health Problems

There are no genetic or common health problems known to be directly linked with this breed. That said, Karelian bear dogs are susceptible to certain conditions that affect all canines, such as:

  • Hip Dysplasia: Lameness caused by abnormal development of the hip joints
  • Cataracts: Loss of vision due to cloudiness developing in the lenses of the eyes

Annual vet visits will help your pet maintain optimum health and prevent and recognize any problems sooner. If you intend to buy a Karelian from a breeder, ask about any health tests given to the parents.

Diet and Nutrition

The Karelian bear dog should be fed high-quality canine food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared, with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval.

Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age and activity level. Because this breed is very active, consider a working or active breed formula to account for the dog’s high-energy needs. Always make sure that they have clean and fresh water that’s easily accessible and available. Check with your veterinarian should you have any questions or concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

Where to Adopt or Buy a Karelian Bear Dog

The Karelian bear dog is not a common breed found in the U.S., so finding one for a pet might be difficult. If you find a breeder, expect to pay approximately $1,700. Here are some sources that may help you start your journey to getting a Karelian:

  • American Karelian Bear Dog Alliance
  • AKC Marketplace
  • Ann’s Karelian Bear Dog (breeder)

Karelian Bear Dog Overview

Pros

  • No breed-specific genetic health issues
  • Protective nature makes it an excellent watchdog
  • Intelligence makes it fairly easy to train

Cons

  • Needs a lot of exercise for high energy level
  • Bred to be naturally aggressive requiring socialization
  • Not suitable for apartment dwellers

More Dog Breeds And Further Research

Before you decide on a Karelian bear dog, be sure to do plenty of research and involve your entire family in the decision. Learning more about the intricacies about this breed helps set both your family and the dog up for success. Does your lifestyle correlate with this breed of dog’s traits? Do you have the time to provide the physical and mental exercise needs for this dog? Will this dog be a good fit for your family? Also, remember this breed may be difficult to find in the U.S.

If you’re interested in the Karelian bear dog, consider researching similar breeds:

  • Finnish spitz
  • Norwegian elkhound
  • Norwegian buhund

There’s a whole world of potential dog breeds out there-with a little research, you can find the right one to bring home!

FAQ

Are Karelian bear dogs good family dogs?

A Karelian isn’t considered to be a very popular family dog simply because it is bred to be a naturally aggressive and stealth hunter. This can result in a dog that’s suspicious toward other animals and strangers. A Karelian also may play too rough with very small children, though this breed is rarely known to bite humans. If the dog will ben’t highly socialized and trained, it may also chase youngsters it considers prey.

What are Karelian bear dogs bred for today?

This ancient breed continues to be bred to help hunt and bring down all sizes of animals including large species like bears, lynxes, wild boars, elks, and moose.

Why is a Karelian bear dog considered higher in intelligence than other breeds?

The Karelian is said to be extremely smart, but that’s probably because it tends to remain intensely focused on the task at hand. The dog is a silent hunter until it traps its prey. One of its greatest skills is usually that it can communicate to its master the type of animal it has located just by using a specific bark.

By DogCareTips.Net

Add Comment